The Galecia Group, headed up by Lori Bowen Ayre, has established an excellent reputation for providing high quality consulting in technologies that are becoming necessities for the 21st century library: self-service technologies, automated materials handling, RFID, and open source software.

We partner with libraries to evaluate materials handling workflows from acquisitions to interlibrary delivery. We take libraries through a longer term Lean process improvement project or just recommend simple workflow and work space modifications. We seek to combine the best combination of self-service technologies, materials handling solutions and/or RFID to address the library's primary pain points and budget. We document long-term savings and benefits (for staff and patrons alike) from these smart investments. And, equally important, we provide support for the technology integration process (aka change management) to ensure the investment in technology is fully realized.

We help libraries make good software choices for their ILS, content management system, and resource-sharing systems by helping define the requirements that really matter and guide libraries through a highly collaborative procurement process. And recently, we've begun offering Drupal development and support services.

Library RFID Tag Technology and Smartphones

If you haven't signed that RFID contract yet, you may want to set down your pen and check one thing....is the chip in your vendor's RFID tag capable of locking and password-protecting your content as well as the AFI and EAS registers?  If not, don't sign that contract.  Here's why....

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ISO Tags - What Does That Mean?

Skiers using RFID Ski Passes"ISO tags" can mean a lot of different things. For a long time, when vendors said they had "ISO tags," they meant that the tags comply with ISO-15693 which is a standard that applies to the physical tag itself. That was okay for awhile but now what we are looking for in the physical tag is compliance with ISO 18000-3, Mode 1.  

The reason it is important to specify ISO 18000-3, Mode 1 is because of the Application Family Identifier (AFI).  This is a special register on the tag.  It isn't a field that contains data - I'm not addressing content on the tag in this post.  The AFI register is a special feature of the tag separate from the data elements and the chip itself.  

So, this AFI register is what the ISO 28560 compliant tag uses for security. And security is more broadly defined than you might think.  The AFI, when used properly, indicates that the item to which it is affixed is either a "circulating library item" or a "non-circulating library item."  So, not only does it tell your library security gates to alarm when it sees a noncirculating library item leaving the building, it also ensures that security gates at Kohl's ignore your library books.  Similarly, when someone walks into your library with an item tagged with an ISO 18000-3 tag (and there are lots of other industries that use them), it ensures that your gates don't alarm.  

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Salt Lake City Kicking Some Tagging .....

One of my clients, Salt Lake City Library, is kicking some RFID tagging booty!  They are tagging in teams of two using 3M Conversion Stations.  While most of the team of averaging about 300 items tagged per hour, one of their energizer bunny teams (not surprisingly from the Children's Department) hit the 650 books in an hour mark.  Very impressive!

And if you always wondered what it means to RFID tag your collection, check out these great little videos.

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Harmonization of Library Protocols

I just got back from attending my first NCIP Standing Committee meeting at OCLC headquarters in Dublin, Ohio.  It turned out to be a far better experience than I could have imagined. The people working on this committee are dedicated to making NCIP the "go-to" protocol for communications with the ILS/LMS. My objective going there was to possibly challenge that idea insofar as my intention was to introduce them to the Library Communcation Framework (LCF) - a protocol being developed in the U.K. by people who aspire to make LCF the library "go-to" protocol.

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LCF - Collaborating Internationally to Leap Forward

Collaborative Librarianship, Volume 5, Number 1
Tuesday, April 16, 2013
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Collaborative Librarianship has published its first issue of 2013. It looks like a great issue with an editorial by our editor, Ivan Gaetz, entitled "Compelling and Necessary Momentum: A Recent Timeline in Open Access" and an articlbe about Orbis-Cascade Alliance's selection of Alma for their shared library system as just one piece of their merging services.

 My column, Technology Matters, talks about the Library Communication Framework.  It starts like this...

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