2013

State-of-the-Art Solutions and the Future of Delivery

This is my 30-minute presentation at the ALA2013 preconference co-sponsored by the Discovery to Delivery and Rethinking Resource-Sharing Interest Groups. My topic was state of the art delivery solutions and the future of delivery. 

2013

Whose Job is it Anyway?

The latest issue of Collaborative Librarianship has just been published along with my Technology Matters column entitled, Whose Job is it Anyway? Here's a little snippet:

...the people involved with ReadersFirst represent exactly the kind of library leaders we need involved in all software procurements. They are librarians committed to serving their communities and they understand that, in order to do this, they have to have a very solid understanding of the technology they are using.

 

2013

RFID, GPS, and 3G - Radio Wave Technologies and Privacy

Another issue of Collaborative Librarianship is out and my Technology Matters column is about radio wave technologies and where the biggest privacy concerns really are. Some people refer to RFID chips as "tiny trackers" and that certainly makes them sound creepy. But it could be that the creepiest "tracker" out there is our beloved smartphone!

Here's an excerpt:

2012

RFID and the Metric Systems: Lessons to be Learned

Presentation at the RFID in Libraries Conference held in London on November 15, 2012.

2012

Open Source Resource-Sharing in California

Presentation about the Open Source resource-sharing product, Fulfillment, and what is happening in California with it (small pilot testing group), and how it could affect the future of resource-sharing in California.  

The short presentation was followed by an energetic discussion about resource-sharing issues in California.

2012

Materials Handling Automation to Reduce Operating Costs

Co-presented this session with Alan Kirk Gray (Darien Library), Gretchen Freeman (Salt Lake County Library) and John Callahan (Palm Beach County Library). Session was sponsored by PLA.

I provided the overview of the materials handling automation market and then each presenter talked about what they learned about how to reduce operating expenses as part of their implementation and operation of an automated materials handling system.

Our key take-aways:

Planning:

2012

Application Development

I presented a session with Jed Moffitt of KCLS on how to get going with new developers in the Evergreen environment. My part of the session focused on the protocols to follow to help ensure your developer has a warm reception from other developers and helps ensure that others know about what you have in mind.

Also included: a sample contract you might want to check out for you and your new developer.

2012

RFID in Libraries: A Step Toward Interoperability

From the Introduction: 

It’s an interesting time to be writing an issue devoted to RFID. So much has changed for libraries in the last decade. Ten years ago, it seemed like RFID was poised to take off and become a standard piece of library technology. But standards were slow to develop, and e-books were not. While libraries waited for RFID standards to develop, the iPad and Kindle emerged. As a result, libraries are struggling more with DRM, discovery interfaces, and patron authentication systems than with new technologies focused on their physical material.

2012

Top Tech Trends in Materials Handling (Back in Circulation Conference)

Presentation for Back in Circulation Conference Again held at University of Wisconsin-Madison. This updated session on trends in materials handling technology began with an historical look at how current technologies have evolved. The Speaker's Notes and Slides handout below provides speaker's notes and lots of images of state-of-the art products plus links to useful resources for getting more info.

Speakers Notes and Slides

2012

Holding Your Vendor's Feet to the Fire

Debut "Technology Matters" column for Collaborative Librarianship. This article, Holding Your Vendor's Fee to the Fire, talks about the importance of standards in library technology and encourages libraries to be more demanding about the importance of adherence to those standards.

The article begins like this:

"The nut. The bolt. When you go to the hard-ware store with a bolt in hand, you probably feel pretty confident that you’ll be able to find the nut you need to tighten that bolt. When I hand over my bolt to my local Rex Ace Hardware man, he strides down a nearby aisle and within seconds, I’ve got my bolt’s mate. It screws on perfectly. Do I care who made the bolt or the nut? I do not. This is because nuts and bolts have standard on sizes and threads. Any quar-ter inch nut will screw onto any quarter inch bolt.