Displaying 21 - 30 of 268
  • Aug 21, 2014

    I'm pleased to announce that there is now a demo version of the new Evergreen web-based staff client.  Check it out here:

    https://webby.evergreencatalog.com/eg/staff/

    login: admin password: demo123

    It's not done yet but  it already looks pretty darn good!  Congratulations to everyone who has contributed to this new development including:

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  • May 18, 2014

    Atlanta, GA - May 13, 2014 - LYRASIS and The Galecia Group announce that LYRASIS will be managing and hosting the Open Source ILS Feature Comparison Tool under the LYRASIS FOSS4LIB project, beginning immediately. The move is part of the Open Source Decision Support Tools project, funded in part by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The Open Source ILS Feature Comparison Tool, previously on galecia.com, is now available at http://ils.foss4lib.org/

    The Open Source ILS Feature Comparison tool compares more than 1,000 features between the Koha and Evergreen open source integrated library systems, and was designed to help libraries navigate open source software options and determine the best fit for their needs. The tool was created in 2012 by The Galecia Group with help from dozens of content contributors from the Koha and Evergreen communities. The project was funded through the Empowering Libraries with Open Source project, part of an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) grant awarded to the King County Library System (WA). This move is part of a wider enhancement effort on the FOSS4LIB site, with integration of the ILS feature comparison site with the main FOSS4LIB site, including unified logins and links between the two sites coming soon. The ability to compare other types of software packages in addition to integrated library systems will also be added in the coming months. After completing a registration process, librarians can create custom reports of just the features they need for their libraries. Those who have already registered can still use their login. New users can register athttp://ils.foss4lib.org/user/register.

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  • Apr 1, 2014

    Grand Rapids Public Library is breaking new ground again!  They've implemented Smart Float in their Evergreen system.  They've written the code and its working. Now they are working to get that code into the next release of Evergreen.  

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  • Mar 31, 2014

    If you are designing a new building, you shouldn’t be considering automated materials handling (AMH).  You should be planning for it. 

    \When we talk about AMH, we are usually referring to two components:  a self-check-in machine and a sorter. With prices well under $30,000 to get a 3-bin AMH unit, nearly every library can afford one – budget-wise and space-wise.  They cost less than one FTE and can take up as little as 8’x10’ in floor space meaning it costs less than the FTE it saves.  And your AMH unit will never have any ergonomic injuries no matter how many returns it checks in every hour. 

    A 3-bin AMH is the smallest size that makes sense.  It allows you to get items checked in immediately-which patrons really appreciate.  And, it separates the material that needs staff attention from material that can go right back up on the shelves-which staff really appreciate.  I usually recommend that the third bin be used for sorting out the returns that need to “go home” so they can easily be moved to delivery bins.

    The most common size sorters fall in the 5-bin to 9-bin range.  It turns out that there is a point of diminishing returns (no pun intended) when it comes to sorter sizes and these 5-9 bin sorters hit some kind of sweet spot.  They are available for under $200,000 and can do the work of 2-3 FTE.  They eliminate numerous steps from the materials handling workflow, and improve services to customers (instant check-in, better turnaround of library material).  Every new library being built should assume they’ll have one -- and libraries that don’t have one now, should be looking into buying one.

    And, in fact, many libraries are getting AMH systems for their libraries. Vendors report installing 3-4 systems per month.  But, something is going wrong with many of these installations and I don’t think it is the AMH equipment that is at fault.  It has everything to do with whether or not you and your staff are on the same page with the reason you’ve introduced an AMH system into the mix, and whether you've effectively planned for the changes that are required to leverage the new technology.  So, what’s going wrong?

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  • Mar 25, 2014

    The folks at NOBLE, who are part of an Evergreen consortium, have put together a nice, clear YouTube video showing their users how to manage their Holds including how to Suspend and Activate Holds without losing your place in the Queue.  

    Everyone needs this video for their users!  Check it out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57UJDqaMeqY

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  • Feb 19, 2014

    Yo!  California Libraries!  We're going to be crowdsourcing the vote for the proposals for CLA Conference 2014 in Oakland.  Last year, we submitted only a small portion to the crowd vote but this year, our plan is to submit most of them to you to decide.  So, don't you want to know if what you have to contribute is just what people want to hear???  You've got to submit a proposal to find out!

    Conference is in fabulous Oakland, CA November 7-9, 2014.  Info at http://conference.cla-net.org/2014/.

    Deadline for submissions is March 14 at 5pm PST.
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  • Jan 27, 2014

    To successfully roll out RFID, it is critical to establish a clear set of priorities for doing so and to continually make choices based on those priorities. Decisions must be made about how the system will be configured to suit the workflow you want to use. Remodeling may be required to locate equipment where it will be most effective. Signage and patron assistance will be required. Oftentimes, circulation policies need to be modified or materials security strategies need to change.

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    Screenshot of Lori's article titled 'RFID What is Your Strategy published in Strategic Library, Feb 2014
  • Jan 8, 2014

    I'll be doing another webinar for Infopeople soon. This one is Optimizing Materials Handling on the Cheap: How to Lean Your Workflow. I hope you'll attend! More info below...

     

    Date Thursday, January 30th, 2014

    Start Time:          12 Noon Pacific

    1PM Mountain

    2PM Central

    3PM Eastern 

    • Is your backroom overrun with book carts full of in-process material?
    • Does it take more than a couple hours to get your incoming delivery processed?
    • Does it take three days to catch up after a holiday closure?
    • Does it take more than four people to get a new acquisition into circulation?
    • Can you easily determine the age and status of items on every book cart?

     

    As much as we love our book carts, they have helped us develop some very bad habits, and Lean will help us reduce or eliminate some of these bad habits. Lean is a management philosophy designed to identify and eliminate “waste” in a workflow. Waste can be any number of things including waiting, unnecessary handling or transport, duplicating steps, processing that doesn’t provide any benefit to the customer, and unnecessary hand-offs. By eliminating these wastes, we can find an optimal workflow that will get items to our customers faster and reduce our costs.

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  • Nov 7, 2013

    I just came back from the California Library Association Annual Conference (which was a big hit, by the way!).  As usual, I made my way through the exhibits talking with the vendors about ongoing projects and how things are going.  This time, I came away a bit frustrated because it seemed like so many AMH and RFID projects appeared to be going a bit awry.

    The thing is, projects can go wrong very quickly when libraries pursue complex technology implementations without retaining the connection to the "why" of the project.  In order to successfully roll out a capital-intensive technology project, it is critical to establish a clear objective, or set of priorities, for doing so.  And to continually make choices based on those priorities. 

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  • Oct 22, 2013

    Another issue of Collaborative Librarianship is out and my Technology Matters column is about radio wave technologies and where the biggest privacy concerns really are. Some people refer to RFID chips as "tiny trackers" and that certainly makes them sound creepy. But it could be that the creepiest "tracker" out there is our beloved smartphone!

    Here's an excerpt:

    It is easy to jump onto the Big Brother bandwagon and wrap everything in tin foil but the fact is that a lot of these technologies improve our lives, even save lives. Also, more and more people appreciate the convenience provided by these various technologies more than they worry about the implications for privacy. It is important, therefore, for librarians to help our patrons become educated consumers so they can make choices that strike the right balance of privacy and convenience for themselves.

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