Displaying 51 - 60 of 272
  • Oct 2, 2012

    The American Association of School Libraries just reported on the use of filters in schools based on the results of the School Libraries Count! survey conducted January-March, 2012. The results are the predictable mix of good and bad. On the good side (per this report), the filters reduce student distractions and decrease the need for direct supervision.  The filters may even result in "more appropriate" search results.

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  • Sep 23, 2012

    CHICAGO - The following open letter was released by American Library Association (ALA)

    President Maureen Sullivan regarding Simon & Schuster, Macmillan, and Penguin refusal to provide access to their ebooks in U.S. libraries.

    The open letter states:

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  • Sep 11, 2012

    A new website has popped up as a result of a research project undertaken at the University of Tennessee School of Information Sciences. The project was funded from an IMLS grant.  I don't know if there is any expectation of keeping up the site but there are some useful things there and some not-so-useful things there.  Several of us have attempted to contact the lead research, Vandana Singh, so she could correct the misrepresentations. But no one has received a response.  Too bad.

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  • Aug 23, 2012

    Now that we have a national data model, namely ISO 28560-2, it is incumbent on libraries to figure out what to do with it.  Given that there are 24 data elements defined in the data model, only two of which are mandatory (Primary Item ID aka barcode and Tag Content Key), how does the library decide which of those optional 22 it will use?

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  • Jul 30, 2012

    I recently participated in a discussion about how to deal with patrons who are nervous about the health effects of RFID.  We all know RFID is harmless, right? My answer is that if you are concerned about EMF (electomagnetic radiation exposure), then library RFID tags should be the least of your worries. Notice that I'm not saying RFID is harmless...

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  • Jul 5, 2012

    I've suggested many times that somewhere along the way, we are going to need to find a way to test the encoding of our RFID tags.  Now that we have a US Data Model, libraries need to be able to ensure that their encoded tags comply with ISO 28560-2.  At this point, the only company that I know of that can do such a thing is Convergent Software (out of the UK).

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  • Jun 29, 2012

    I haven't talked much about filters lately as it seems that they have just quietly found their way into some libraries or have been decidedly eliminated from consideration in others (San Jose Public being one of the more public examples). But every once in a while something comes through the newsfeed that really points out the importance of paying attention to what is happening with filters in some libraries and, in this case, some schools.

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  • Jun 28, 2012

    I wasn't able to attend the Urban Library Council's Annual Forum but I was happy to read the highlights in their newsletters.  ULC reported that political commentator, Donna Brazile, launched the Forum with a rousing call to arms, " This is a moment for libraries to soar and shine...This is a moment when leaders emerge" and then Brazile proceeded to describe key ingredients to effective leadership:

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  • Jun 22, 2012

    Yesterday the Exhibit Hall opened and I spent some time with vendors learning what's new.  Here's what I found out.

    Envisionware has a new(ish) kiosk along the lines of Evanced BranchAnywhere.  It was debuted at PLA but I guess I missed it.  It's a nice looking product.  Three models available in varying capacities:  200, 400, 800.  The one on display is the 400 item model.  What I like about this product is its simplicity.  No giant cranes for putting the items that are returned back in the slots.  Instead returns are sorted into one of 5-6 bins inside so staff can quickly grab the right bin to do whatever needs to be done (e.g. reload the items in one bin, take this bin back to the library to fill holds, etc).

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  • Jun 3, 2012

    I am one of several consultants participating in the free consulting sessions being provided as part of the Consultants Give Back programs delivered at the major conferences.  The date for CGB at ALA Anaheim is Sunday, June 24th from 1:30-5:30 at the Conference Center, Room 203B. 

    I had hoped that our co-sponsors (ASCLA and PLA) would provide a handy webpagethat listed the consultants participating but evidently simple webpages are hard to come by!  Instead, there is a downloadable PDF (grrrr) circulating (somewhere) as a press release.  Good luck finding it!

    So, for your convenience, I offer the following list. Please contact the consultant directly if you'd like to make an appointment at the Conference.   

    Lori Bowen Ayre, The Galecia Group

    • lori.ayre@galecia.com
    • http:/galecia.com
    • Open source software (Koha, Evergreen, Fulfillment) evaluation and planning; materials handling workflow optimization, automated materials handling and RFID assessment, selection, and ROI.
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